point101

An interview with Lucy Brown

Lucy is a London based illustration artist and designer. Her beautifully detailed drawings on paper and vellum combined make these otherworldly scenes appear all the more ephemeral. Although traditional in style and technique, these imaginative creations succeed in poetically evoking and enchanting our sensitivity to this fine art.

'“Together her exploration of animals and humans is an attempt at understanding the complexities between the natural world and human nature.”

Point101: How did you become interested in illustrating?

Lucy Brown:  I have always been interested in drawing people since I was a little girl, which developed into my career in costume design. There’s a curiosity I have towards understanding what’s beyond the surface of a person - pain, joy, intrigue, love, playfulness? Then exploring these ideas through drawing animals came later as I started to feel more connected with nature and the environment we share. I’m beginning to carve out a space to express my creativity through illustration, and trying to replace my sense of imposter-syndrome with an authentic delight for what I do.

P101: Why the material preferences? 


LB: I used to exclusively paint in watercolour (which I still enjoy), but then Dura-lar was a great discovery for me. The way the matte film takes the coloured pencil enables a more delicate approach to drawing which I think adds to the whimsy of the storytelling. I would like to make use of the milky transparency of the material and begin experimenting with layering the film sheets.


Media print is definitely something of interest to me.

P101: Tell us about your technique  


LB: I like walking along the river by my apartment, spending time with my sister’s dogs, Dolly and Violet. There’s a therapeutic element to being around nature and animals which opens my mind to make space for ideas to come forward. Then I take this inspiration, along with a cup of coffee, and develop the ideas through simple sketches and colour stories. Once I have the basic layout and composition in place I focus in on the details. Having come from a design background I have developed quite a solid process of working through ideas and trying to be consistent. However, I do like to let my work evolve in a way that feels organic and natural. I’m working on trying to leave some of the detail out, to make room for the work to breath a little.

P101: How long does each illustration typically take?


LB:  On average, a piece would take anywhere between 20-40 hours, but it depends on what time I have available. Sometimes a tight deadline can produce the most uninhibited work. It leaves you less time for self doubt.

P101: Where do the narratives to your drawings come from?


LB:  I like to reminisce and day dream…..I’m a classic Pisces. Nostalgia is often gently weaved throughout my work, with a devotion to compassion. I like each piece to be it’s own little world, a place where I can explore dreams and stories. I’m inspired by Vermeer’s magnetic use of colour and light. I enjoy listening to one of my favourite bands, Fleet Foxes, whilst I draw. Their music is so beautiful and their storytelling through word and melody is haunting and romantic. My quest is to capture that on paper somehow…haha! I’m always drawn to films and plays where it’s about what’s not said as much as what is said. I like leaving a little space for the audience to breath their own voice into the artwork. However, the other side of me sometimes just wants to draw something silly and a little humorous, with colour and vitality. 

P101: Are you strictly a solo artist?


LB: I usually work alone, however I’ve worked in theatre for many years so I know the triumphs which come from collaborating with fellow artists. I’m always open to the possibilities of such creative adventures as well as pushing myself further with my work.

P101: Where do you envision your artwork belonging?


LB: I would love to exhibit in a gallery, that’s a dream of mine to create a series for exhibition. Currently, I’ve been creating for personal prints. However, collaborating with an author for illustrative book work would also be a delight. I really just love drawing and working and seeing how it evolves.

P101: What type of paper do you think works best with your printed artwork?


LB: I love the Hahnemuhle Photorag because of its texture and beautiful print quality. Lovely Pauline at Print 101 recommended it to me.

P101: How does this artistic pursuit fit in with your day to day life?


LB: My day to day life is drawing, walking my sister’s dogs, then designing (I still work as a Costume Designer, which I love). I try to commit to drawing a little each day, to be curious and inspired by my surroundings. If I wait for a lightening bolt to strike then I would never work.

P101: Do you have any other interests/hobbies that influence/inspire you? 


LB: Does singing along to musicals (badly) and watching Miss Marple count as an interesting hobby? I really just love the simplicity of reading a book and drinking tea, with cake of course! Oh and I love Arthur Miller, reading his plays are always a source of inspiration for character study.

See more of Lucy’s work here.

point101 hahnemuhle giclee print

Interview with Ryadraws

Ryadraws is a London based digital artist, currently exhibiting at Rivington Studios as part of The Anti Trump Art Show. 

 

Tell us about your upcoming exhibition as part of Creative Debuts Anti Trump art show

The exhibition will focus on our depictions of America’s celebrity in chief, Trump!  

There was an open call put out a couple of months ago, and I was one of the artists selected to exhibit on the 12th of July.

 

How strongly do you feel about social art as a young practicing artist?

Day by day we are continually being presented with distractions, and we forget what is going on around us. The issues that deserve our attention. Social art is a way for us to be informed by pretty pictures.

 

Where do you envision your work belonging? 

Magazines but mainly in galleries. We have gotten to a point where digital art is becoming more widely accepted and galleries treat digital art like you would any traditional painting.

 

How would you describe your techniques?

I replicate my traditional drawing process but in a digital space. Most of my work will start off with a pencil sketch on paper, and then I will scan the image in and render digitally.

I layer my images metaphorically, and bury meaning within to be discovered, and when possible add an Adrinka symbol if it matches the artwork.

The Adrinka’s are Ghanaian symbols of the Ashanti that represent thoughts and I use them in my work to further explain my ideas.  

 

Would you call yourself more of a traditional artist?

No, a lot of my work is digital, and there is no physical output until printed. Digital art has made my process more straightforward, I don’t have to think about being extra careful while drawing to make sure I don’t smudge the page etc.

Painting and sculptures are on my radar to explore, and I do write from time to time - I doubt I will ever share them though.

 

point101 hahnemuhle giclee print

What type of paper do you think works best with your printed artwork?

Hahnemuhle German Etching is literally the only thing I print on and gives me the desired visual. I can’t get enough of the grain and paper texture.

 

When you aren’t producing art, what do you like to do?

Sleeping, watching TV shows and I play games from time to time. I’m currently playing Zelda: Breathe of the wild. I set myself a project often just so I don’t get burnt out from drawing. At the moment, I’m teaching myself UI/UX and animation.

The usual stuff, reading and hanging out with friends.

 

Is there anything that particularly influences your projects or inspires you? 

Everything around me. Unfortunately, a lot of what fuels my practise tends to be the negatives. I’ll flip it and show my outlook on the topic.

 

Any more exciting projects on the horizon?

I will be illustrating a children’s book focusing on Ghanaian lore. Also on the horizon is a billboard illustration which will be a painting focusing on social commentary. I have a few ideas floating around on what I’m going to paint.

 

 

Ryadraws and The Anti Trump Art Show

The Anti Trump Art Show promotion with Ryadraws' artwork

The Anti Trump Art Show promotion with Ryadraws' artwork

 

"In response to Donald’s Trump’s planned visit to London on 13th July, Creative Debuts have joined forces with over 50 artists to show their collective disdain of the, ‘dangerous racism, sexism and narcissism that flow daily from the White House,’ through a unique art exhibition.
The exhibition celebrates a specially curated range of contemporary artwork including photography, sculpture, craft, fine art, and film whilst raising money for End Violence Against Women"-Creative Debuts 2018
 
 

See more of Ryadraws' work here.

Check out Creative Debuts.