‘Petrified’  printed on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308gsm

‘Petrified’ printed on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308gsm

Branded as Mamlok, Audrey Manlot is a London based illustrator and art director. With a focus on feminine empowerment and the bond between women and nature, Audrey takes inspiration in an eco-feminist dialogue, resulting “in an aesthetic utopia where Strength and Beauty are embodied into women who thrive in a state of nature.“

Her work will be part of METAMORPHOSIS” running from 1 - 5 May 2019 at Ugly Duck, London. Opening night on Wednesday 1st of May, 6pm (RSVP below).


Point101: Tell us about women empowerment 

Audrey Manlot: The concept of being a Woman has always intrigued me. Since a young age, I’ve been unconsciously fascinated by females who were able to “break the boxes” that confine our gender. Growing up [and] surrounding myself with strong female personalities, I realised my mind was full of imaginary boxes, and my conception of femininity very negative. 

I naturally started to put that on paper as a mean to keep deconstructing those limiting beliefs and explore the positive and liberating wave of feminism that has arisen.

A little part of that work has been about focusing on the place of the Human being in its environment, and his relationship to other species, a question that has also been in my mind for long. Reading about Ecofeminism I found some interesting ideas in line with my instinctive perceptions. I’m still kin to work on Femininity as an ongoing subject, although I’d like to deepen that outside of the prism of Women, as well as a few other themes that I’ve worked on in the past, such as Gender, the Subconscious and a few more. 

P101: Your style is very contemporary and trendy. Is it empowering to you to be part of a contemporary illustrative art scene, a lot of whom are also female? 


AM: It is definitely, the contemporary illustrative art scene has become so boiling and diverse, people see the value to it more than before, which is very motivating, especially seeing so many women in the spotlights. It seems to me that it’s a very inclusive community in term of origins, gender and more, which gives a feeling of being connected to our time.  

‘Organic’  printed on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308gsm

‘Organic’ printed on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308gsm

P101: How do your illustrations come to be?


AM: I like to keep the human feel to the image because it makes more sense with the subjects I work on and for my personal aesthetic preference. I work with ink on paper for that organic aspect of the lines and then colourise digitally. I started digital drawing last year, which is very different and as interesting, it opens to a lot of exploration, I’m still experimenting in term of style.

P101: Tell us about your technique


AMFor the conceptual part it varies, I collect quotes, ideas, articles on the day to day life and refer to it when comes the time to produce something. Sometimes I just have an epiphany and there’s a whole image that pops into my brain that I need to execute straight away. 

I sometimes sketch a draft on paper for the image construction, or I can also jump on it straight away and improvise. The colouring part is my pet peeve, I got a bit better over time but I always spend ages adjusting the colour palette. 


P101: How does your profession as an art director fit into your passion for illustration?

AMI’ve had a few projects where I’ve been able to combine both disciplines, usually it’s quite compartmented though. I must say I’m trying to stay focused on illustration now and leave graphic design aside. 

I’ve also co-founded an ethical clothing brand called Osun Womenswear, for which I create prints, so that’s my other focus at the moment.


P101: Where do you place your work?


AM: I’ve worked for quite a various range of applications, from magazine to packaging, real estate, websites, logo design, audio tape too! My personal work is for print sales and exhibitions when I get the opportunity. 

I am actually exhibiting this week with Cluster Illustration at the Ugly Duck. The opening is on Wednesday evening, it’s free and everybody is welcome!


P101: Tell us about your collaborations and how these come about for you

AM: It is usually a word of mouth, I’ve mostly been contacted on some previous collaborator’s recommendations, I should definitely make more contacts myself, it’s the part of the business where I still have a lot of learning to do. 

I’ve never been in a situation where I was reluctant to accept a proposition, unless for lack of availability. I would like to diversify my collaborations in order to explore new fields and angles of work, I’m very keen to do some work in the music industry for example, as I find visual arts and music are always very interesting projects.


P101: What giclee paper do you think works best with your prints?


AM: I’ve printed on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag and German Etching for now, I like the texture of the Photo Rag and the contrast it creates with bright colours. I’d like to try other options soon like the Bamboo paper.



P101: What do you do outside illustrating and being an art director?


AM: My other main focus is Osun, a clothing brand I launched recently with a friend, for which I design the prints. It’s made in London and all about Slow Fashion. I also have a part-time job, so I compartment my time between those 3 activities, which can be tricky sometimes but keeps me active and also enables me to step back from my illustrative work and come back to it with a fresh eye.


P101: Tell us about your interests and hobbies which influence or inspire you 


AM: In term of [a] hobby, I’ve recently started Viet Vo Dao (Vietnamese Kung-fu), not that it’s quirky but I’ve never thought I would be practicing a Martial Art, and I find it very interesting and complex. I could think of a project linked to that soon.

Other than that, I get inspiration from people, places, shows, music, films, I feel our brains are sponges that absorb a crazy amount of information every day, and if you put it into the right drawer of your mind, it can turn into something creative (I will make an illustration of that :) )



“METAMORPHOSIS”  MAY 2019. Curated by  Ema E. Marinova

“METAMORPHOSIS” MAY 2019. Curated by Ema E. Marinova

P101: Do you have any upcoming shows or publications?

AM: Yes, I am exhibiting this week (1st to 5th of May) with Cluster Illustration at the Ugly Duck, near Tower Bridge. There will be a lot of other illustrators and there is also a part dedicated to Fashion.

Event RSVP & Info.


Find more on Mamlok here and follow her on Instagram







Posted
AuthorNazy Raouf

Villagers watch exhumation at a former Iraqi military headquarters outside Sulaymaniyah, Northern Iraq,  1991 © Susan Meiselas

Villagers watch exhumation at a former Iraqi military headquarters outside Sulaymaniyah, Northern Iraq, 1991 © Susan Meiselas

Now in its 22nd year, this prestigious prize is awarded annually by the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation in conjunction with The Photographer’s Gallery. Nominees need to have made significant contributions to the medium over the past year within Europe.

Originally known as the Citigroup Photography Prize or Citibank Private Bank Photography Prize, it was renamed as such from 2005 onward when Deutsche Borse began to sponsor the competition and award the winner a £30,000 prize.

The title went through one final change to include ‘Foundation’ in 2016 to "to reflect its new position within the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation, a specifically established non-profit organisation focused on the collecting, exhibiting and promoting of contemporary photography.” (The Photographers' Gallery 2017).

Since its formation, the prize has been awarded to now renowned names such as Richard Billingham (the very first winner), Andreas Gursky, Rineke Dijkstra, Anna Gaskell, Boris Mikhailov, Shirana Shahbazi, Robert Adams, Walid Raad, Sophie Ristelhueber, Jim Goldberg and John Stezaker.

Those shortlisted are just as celebrated and enjoy the exposure this competition exhibition offers. These include Uta Barth, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Hannah Starkey, Stephen Shore, Yto Barrada, Fazal Sheikh, Anna Fox, Thomas Demand, Rinko Kawauchi, Mishka Henner and Sophie Calle.

This years nominees do not fall short of the same high standard: Laia Abril for the publication On Abortion (Dewi Lewis Publishing, November 2017); Susan Meiselas for the exhibition Mediations (Jeu de Paume, Paris, 6 February – 30 May 2018);  Arwed Messmer for the exhibition RAF – No Evidence / Kein Beweis (ZEPHYR|Raum für Fotografie, Mannheim, 9 September – 5 November 2017) and Mark Ruwedel for the exhibition Artist and Society: Mark Ruwedel (16 February – 16 December 2018 at Tate Modern, London).

The Jury comprises of Sunil Gupta, artist, writer, activist and curator; Diane Dufour, Director of Le Bal, Paris; Felix Hoffmann, Chief Curator at C/O Berlin; Anne-Marie Beckmann, Director, Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation, Frankfurt and Brett Rogers, Director, The Photographers' Gallery, London, as the non-voting chair.

This year’s prize is less about the best photographs, whatever that might mean, and more focused on research and documentation, and compilation and presentation. 

“Collectively their projects explore state and gender politics, social injustice, human rights and conceptual approaches to image making."

RAF No Evidence/Kein Beweis , 2017 © Arwed Messmer: research, concept and editing; source: Berlin Police Historical Collection, 2018

RAF No Evidence/Kein Beweis, 2017 © Arwed Messmer: research, concept and editing; source: Berlin Police Historical Collection, 2018

Starting on the 5th floor is German photographer and artist Arwed Messmer, nominated for his project ‘RAF - No Evidence / Kein Beweis’. This body of work is completed in his signature style; focusing primarily on posing questions about photography using imagery of historical events from German state archives and specifically focusing on the ‘Red Army Faction (RAF) or ‘Baarder-Meinhof Group’ from the 1960s and 70s. This far left extremist organisation engaged in various terrorist attacks with events widely documented by police. Messmer’s hones in on the events from 1967 to 1977 which span student protests, police reenactments and forensic and documentary photographs, all to ‘examine how images once used as evidence in criminal cases can now provide a unique insight into our understanding of history’.

Taymour Abdullah, 15, the only survivor of village execution, shows his bullet wound, Arbil, Northern Iraq, December,  1991 © Susan Meiselas

Taymour Abdullah, 15, the only survivor of village execution, shows his bullet wound, Arbil, Northern Iraq, December, 1991 © Susan Meiselas

Susan Meiselas occupies the adjoining space with her long-term and extensive project ‘Mediations’ of which she has selected ‘Kurdistan/akaKurdistan’ for her prize consideration. Started in the 1990s and after seeing the exhumations of mass graves in Iraqi Kurdistan following Saddam Hussein’s genocide Anfal campaign (1987-88), the photography here shows Meiselas’ documentation of the aftermath; capturing graves, archeological excavations and individual survivors. This body of work has become an archive still active today (as website akaKurdistan.com), gathering visual evidence in the form of documents, family albums, maps and most importantly, personal stories. Examples of such collected visual evidence is on display here in museum display tables as maps, documents and family albums, as well as an entire wall dedicated to personal accounts of people within the Kurdistan borders and across the diaspora.

“This deeply affecting project examples Meiselas’ artistic approach and outstanding merit as an image-maker, whilst highlighting the collaborative nature of her documentary work”

“The exhibition reveals her unique approach as an artist who has constantly questioned the status of the image in relation to the context in which it appears.”

Portrait of Marta, 29, Poland. “On January 2, 2015, I travelled to Slovakia to have an abortion. [In Poland, abortion is illegal except in cases of sexual assault, serious fetal deformation, or threat to the mother’s life] I was too scared to take DIY abortion pills alone. What if something went wrong? So I decided to get a surgical abortion in a clinic abroad. I felt upset about borrowing money for the procedure, and lonely and frustrated because I couldn’t tell anyone what was happening. The hardest part was facing my boyfriend, who opposes abortion. All the same, I felt stronger and more mature afterwards.”  © Laia Abril, 2018

Portrait of Marta, 29, Poland. “On January 2, 2015, I travelled to Slovakia to have an abortion. [In Poland, abortion is illegal except in cases of sexual assault, serious fetal deformation, or threat to the mother’s life] I was too scared to take DIY abortion pills alone. What if something went wrong? So I decided to get a surgical abortion in a clinic abroad. I felt upset about borrowing money for the procedure, and lonely and frustrated because I couldn’t tell anyone what was happening. The hardest part was facing my boyfriend, who opposes abortion. All the same, I felt stronger and more mature afterwards.” © Laia Abril, 2018

The fourth floor holds work from Laia Abril’s publication ‘On Abortion’, a visually comprehensive project about abortion; from its disturbing past to its still politically disturbing consideration today. As the first chapter of Abril’s long-term project, A History of Misogyny, this exhibition not only traces the history of abortion, but also brings to light “the repercussions of not having access to abortion in the world”

Like many of Abril’s ongoing projects, this too conveys her tendencies of trying to visualise what is invisible because it is illegal, hidden, or an event of the past.

Intimate portraits, photographs of early contraceptive devices, personal accounts of those who have lived through the procedure as well as ‘incendiary, hate-filled quotes from outspoken opposers to abortion rights’ cover these gallery walls in hope of inviting viewers to actively learn and form opinions on the topic. Prominent to the exhibit is its central attraction; a solitary chair facing a television looping pointed anti-abortion speech from various outspoken male antiabortionists (including current US president Donald Trump).

“The project addresses the marginalised position of women in past and contemporary societies, whilst exposing the many social triggers, stigmas and taboos that still persist around abortion and female health.”

Hells Canyon,  1999 © Mark Ruwedel, 2018

Hells Canyon, 1999 © Mark Ruwedel, 2018


The final photographer shortlisted is Mark Ruwedel. His work on display spans the past four decades, exploring the impact that geological, historic and political events have had on the North American terrain. Photography from the following projects are on display: ‘Dusk’, showing empty desert homes under the twilight sky; ‘Pictures from Hell’, depicting awe-inspiring landscapes which generations of settlers evocatively named Helltown, Devils Gardens, Hells Hollow or Devils Land; ‘Crater', which shows eerie photographs of nuclear test sites, and his homage to the artist Ed Ruscha -‘We All Loved Ruscha'. 

Ruwedel recognises that his photography does not always explicitly show the ‘imprint of human activity’. He is more interested in the act of naming, mainly because of the fact that these places used to have indigenous names, aiming to question what this says about ‘dominant European attitudes toward both the land and the people that inhabited it’.

“Merging documentary and conceptual methods of image making, Ruwedel’s practice echoes historical photographic processes.”

With the intent of acknowledging those whose work discerns to “uniquely address and expand the fluency and capabilities of the medium”, this year’s prize can really be awarded to any of the four. All work here, at least in this printers’ opinion, is good work.

More info: Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation The Photographer’s Gallery

Posted
AuthorNazy Raouf

point101

An interview with Lucy Brown

Lucy is a London based illustration artist and designer. Her beautifully detailed drawings on paper and vellum combined make these otherworldly scenes appear all the more ephemeral. Although traditional in style and technique, these imaginative creations succeed in poetically evoking and enchanting our sensitivity to this fine art.

'“Together her exploration of animals and humans is an attempt at understanding the complexities between the natural world and human nature.”

Point101: How did you become interested in illustrating?

Lucy Brown:  I have always been interested in drawing people since I was a little girl, which developed into my career in costume design. There’s a curiosity I have towards understanding what’s beyond the surface of a person - pain, joy, intrigue, love, playfulness? Then exploring these ideas through drawing animals came later as I started to feel more connected with nature and the environment we share. I’m beginning to carve out a space to express my creativity through illustration, and trying to replace my sense of imposter-syndrome with an authentic delight for what I do.

P101: Why the material preferences? 


LB: I used to exclusively paint in watercolour (which I still enjoy), but then Dura-lar was a great discovery for me. The way the matte film takes the coloured pencil enables a more delicate approach to drawing which I think adds to the whimsy of the storytelling. I would like to make use of the milky transparency of the material and begin experimenting with layering the film sheets.


Media print is definitely something of interest to me.

P101: Tell us about your technique  


LB: I like walking along the river by my apartment, spending time with my sister’s dogs, Dolly and Violet. There’s a therapeutic element to being around nature and animals which opens my mind to make space for ideas to come forward. Then I take this inspiration, along with a cup of coffee, and develop the ideas through simple sketches and colour stories. Once I have the basic layout and composition in place I focus in on the details. Having come from a design background I have developed quite a solid process of working through ideas and trying to be consistent. However, I do like to let my work evolve in a way that feels organic and natural. I’m working on trying to leave some of the detail out, to make room for the work to breath a little.

P101: How long does each illustration typically take?


LB:  On average, a piece would take anywhere between 20-40 hours, but it depends on what time I have available. Sometimes a tight deadline can produce the most uninhibited work. It leaves you less time for self doubt.

P101: Where do the narratives to your drawings come from?


LB:  I like to reminisce and day dream…..I’m a classic Pisces. Nostalgia is often gently weaved throughout my work, with a devotion to compassion. I like each piece to be it’s own little world, a place where I can explore dreams and stories. I’m inspired by Vermeer’s magnetic use of colour and light. I enjoy listening to one of my favourite bands, Fleet Foxes, whilst I draw. Their music is so beautiful and their storytelling through word and melody is haunting and romantic. My quest is to capture that on paper somehow…haha! I’m always drawn to films and plays where it’s about what’s not said as much as what is said. I like leaving a little space for the audience to breath their own voice into the artwork. However, the other side of me sometimes just wants to draw something silly and a little humorous, with colour and vitality. 

P101: Are you strictly a solo artist?


LB: I usually work alone, however I’ve worked in theatre for many years so I know the triumphs which come from collaborating with fellow artists. I’m always open to the possibilities of such creative adventures as well as pushing myself further with my work.

P101: Where do you envision your artwork belonging?


LB: I would love to exhibit in a gallery, that’s a dream of mine to create a series for exhibition. Currently, I’ve been creating for personal prints. However, collaborating with an author for illustrative book work would also be a delight. I really just love drawing and working and seeing how it evolves.

P101: What type of paper do you think works best with your printed artwork?


LB: I love the Hahnemuhle Photorag because of its texture and beautiful print quality. Lovely Pauline at Print 101 recommended it to me.

P101: How does this artistic pursuit fit in with your day to day life?


LB: My day to day life is drawing, walking my sister’s dogs, then designing (I still work as a Costume Designer, which I love). I try to commit to drawing a little each day, to be curious and inspired by my surroundings. If I wait for a lightening bolt to strike then I would never work.

P101: Do you have any other interests/hobbies that influence/inspire you? 


LB: Does singing along to musicals (badly) and watching Miss Marple count as an interesting hobby? I really just love the simplicity of reading a book and drinking tea, with cake of course! Oh and I love Arthur Miller, reading his plays are always a source of inspiration for character study.

See more of Lucy’s work here.