This week’s image comes from London-based artist Caroline Achaintre who makes work in a variety of mediums including ceramics, hand-tufted wool and drawing/print. This 2009 lino cut, Peacock with my Eyes, is part of Arcade Gallery Editions – a series of handmade works on paper available to buy from the gallery.

Caroline Achaintre, Peacock with my Eyes. lino cut print. 63 x 40.5 cm. Edition of 10. 200

Caroline Achaintre, Peacock with my Eyes. lino cut print. 63 x 40.5 cm. Edition of 10. 200

Achaintre is currently showing new work at ARCADE Gallery on Lever Street. LIMBO runs until 5 March.

Posted
AuthorSacha Waldron

 

Ahead of Classic Photographs Los Angeles at the end of January, Point 102 is looking at some of the highlights from this year’s fair.  You can read the yesterday's post here.

Evelyn Hofer. Homage a Zurbaran [Still life No. 6], New York, 1997. 20 x 24 inch Dye Transfer Print. Signed and titled on verso in pencil. Image courtesy of Rose Gallery, Santa Monica CA

Evelyn Hofer. Homage a Zurbaran [Still life No. 6], New York, 1997.
20 x 24 inch Dye Transfer Print. Signed and titled on verso in pencil. Image courtesy of Rose Gallery, Santa Monica CA

Evelyn Hofer’s still-life of oranges and lemons has the look of the romantic soft-focus propaganda found in early Russian colour photographers such as Ivan Shagin. Hofer (1922-2009) was one of the first artists to adopt colour film as the main focus of her practice returning often, however, to black and white. Her work ranges from portraits to landscape and street photography and she often had a sociological concern at the core of her image-making.  Her work is represented at Class Photographs by Rose Gallery

Jennifer Greenburg. I was not the thinnest, nor the prettiest, but I was the winner!, 2015. Archival Pigment Print. Image courtesy of Wall Space Gallery, Santa Barbara CA

Jennifer Greenburg. I was not the thinnest, nor the prettiest, but I was the winner!, 2015. Archival Pigment Print. Image courtesy of Wall Space Gallery, Santa Barbara CA

Jennifer Greenburg’s photograph I was not the thinnest, nor the prettiest, but I was the winner’ (2015) is the newest work in our selection. Part of her ‘Revising Histories’ portfolio, Greenburg uses found images from the 1940’s to 60’s and replacing the central figure or character in each image with a photograph of herself. She is the blonde being felt up at the party, the new mother holding her baby or, as we see in the photograph here, the beauty contest winner. You really have to look for the deception to find it and it is only when viewing the whole set of images together that it is possible to notice a knowing look from the artist here or a change in photographic tone there. Greenburg has a solo exhibition coming up in March at jdc Fine Art, San Diego and is represented at Classic Photographs by Wall Space Gallery.

Anne Schwalbe. Rosen (roses), 2009. Type C print. Edition of 5. Copyright Anne Schwalbe. Image courtesy of L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York NY

Anne Schwalbe. Rosen (roses), 2009. Type C print. Edition of 5. Copyright Anne Schwalbe. Image courtesy of L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York NY

It is possible to get lost in Anne Schwalbe’s Rosen (roses). A late twilight walk in the gardens of a stately home, the fading light hitting the leaves. It has been raining earlier in the day and the remaining moisture heightens the greens and pinks of the rose bush. You can feel the brisk cold air, hear only the wind and then silence. Anne Schwalbe is a German artist whose work often focuses on the natural environment. She is represented by L. Parker Stephenson Photographs.

Karl Struss. Herald Square, New York, 1911. Platinum print, ca. 1911. Image courtesy of Lee Gallery, Winchester MA

Karl Struss. Herald Square, New York, 1911. Platinum print, ca. 1911. Image courtesy of Lee Gallery, Winchester MA

Karl Struss’ photograph of Herald Square,  New York, shows a city still very in the developmental stages of architectural growth. It is still possible to see a fair amount of sky and space between buildings to the left of the Flatiron Building on the right hand side. Struss made this photograph in the early part of his career, whilst he was still a student at Columbia University. The soft-focus foggy style of the image is due to a soft-focus lens that Struss himself invented called the Struss Pictorial Lens. Struss is represented at the fair by Lee Gallery.

Ansel Adams. Aspens, Northern, New Mexico, 1958. Gelatin silver print, 1975. Image courtesy of Alan Klotz Gallery, New York NY

Ansel Adams. Aspens, Northern, New Mexico, 1958. Gelatin silver print, 1975. Image courtesy of Alan Klotz Gallery, New York NY

Ansel Adams, of course, needs no introduction. This stark black and white image was taken in the Aspens, north of Santa Fe in New Mexico and shows dense wood and then utter blackness – hiding whatever your imagination can conjure. The tree in the foreground is too white, as if on fire. Adams was apparently driving through the mountains with his wife and assistants when he made these photographs and used his larger 8 x 10 plate camera. The Aspens are also known as “the shivering tree” as, it said, the leaves of the trees constantly tremble in even the slightest breeze. This meant that Adams was only able to make a short one second exposure, the composition worked out beforehand gives the photograph the feel of being both considered and snapshot. Adams is represented at Classic Photographs by Alan Klotz Gallery.

Laura Gilpin. Ghost Rock, Garden of the Gods, Colorado, 1919. Platinum print, printed ca. 1919. Image courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York NY

Laura Gilpin. Ghost Rock, Garden of the Gods, Colorado, 1919. Platinum print, printed ca. 1919. Image courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York NY

Laura Gilpin (1891-1979) began taking photographs during her childhood in Colorado before travelling to New York to study at the Clarence H. White School of Photography in 1916. This image of Ghost Rock in the Garden of the Gods, Colorado, was made during a summer break back in her home town. The Garden of the Gods is a national park and popular for its rock climbing due to its unusual and challenging rock formations. In Gilpin's photograph it’s unclear as to whether the rock is actually called Ghost Rock or whether the title refers to the almost transparent shadowy way in which the rock has been captured or indeed the many ghost stories which are associated with the Garden of the Gods in general. Gilpin is represented at the fair by Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Los Angeles Classic Photographs is open 30th/31st January at Bonhams LA, Sunset Boulevard

Running parallel to the fair proper there is a whole programme of talks, tours and photographic book singing/launches. Click here for the full programme

Posted
AuthorSacha Waldron

 

Now in its seventh year, Classic Photographs Los Angeles brings together galleries from across the United States to exhibit the best in both contemporary and vintage photographs. Taking place at Bonhams LA on the 30th and 31st January, the focus is, of course, on trade but the fair also serves as a meeting and networking moment for galleries and as an exhibition platform open to all. Over the next two Point 102 blogs we take you on a pick of some of our favourite images from the fair this year.

Alexey Titarenko, Morningside Park, New York, 2015. Toned gelatin silver print. Copyright Alexey Titarenko. Image courtesy of Nailya Alexander Gallery

Alexey Titarenko, Morningside Park, New York, 2015. Toned gelatin silver print. Copyright Alexey Titarenko. Image courtesy of Nailya Alexander Gallery

Alexey Titarenko’s atmospheric image of New York’s Morningside Park in northern Manhattan could be a still from The Exorcist. Two ghostly black figures, almost imprints or scorches on the snow instead of people, they seem to glow against the landscape. Titarenko had his first solo exhibition in 1978 but was only able to officially declare himself an artist in Russia during the height of Perestroika in 1989, he was also key in the establishment and organisation of dedicated photographic exhibition space Ligovka 99. Titarenko now lives in New York and his work is represented at Classic Photographs by Nailya Alexander Gallery.

John Schott. Untitled, from 'Route 66 Motels', 1973. Vintage gelatin silver print. Image courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery

John Schott. Untitled, from 'Route 66 Motels', 1973. Vintage gelatin silver print. Image courtesy of Joseph Bellows Gallery

John Schott’s image from the ‘Route 66 Motels’ series was made during the summer of 1973 on a road trip from the Midwest to California. Schott slept in the back of his pick-up truck during his time on the road which makes it ironic that his photographic gaze would turn to the motels he encountered on his journey. Although the photograph is Untitled it shows the El Rey Inn in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The Inn opened as the El Rey Auto Court in 1936 with 12 guest rooms and is still open today with 86 rooms in keeping with the original Spanish colonial and Pueblo style. Schott is represented at the fair by Joseph Bellows Gallery.

Andre Kertesz. New York, 1972. Gelatin silver print. Image courtesy of Catherine Couturier Gallery, Houston TX

Andre Kertesz. New York, 1972. Gelatin silver print. Image courtesy of Catherine Couturier Gallery, Houston TX

This 1972 image from Andre Kertesz (1894-1985) shows the Twin Towers which had, only two years before this photo was taken, been finally topped off and named the tallest building in the world. The Hungarian artist started making photographs whilst working as a clerk on the Budapest stock exchange before moving to Paris in 1925 to pursue a career as a freelance photographer. Kertesz emigrated to New York in 1936 due to the difficulties of impending war and worked for much of his professional career as a commercial photographer. He spent his retirement re-focussing his attention on more personal interests and subjects and travelling to show his work internationally. Kertesz is showing as part of the Catherine Couturier Gallery portfolio.

Stephen Shore. 21st St and Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA, 1974. Chromogenic print, printed later. Image courtesy of Gallery 19/21, Guilford CT

Stephen Shore. 21st St and Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA, 1974. Chromogenic print, printed later. Image courtesy of Gallery 19/21, Guilford CT

Stephen Shore made this 1974 photograph of the corner of Twenty-First and Spruce St in Philadelphia at a pivotal moment in his career. Aged just 24 it was the year he was awarded a major solo exhibition at the MET consisting of 224 images made during a road trip across America. The museum went on to buy the whole suite of photographs for their collection. By this time Shore had fully embraced colour photography as a medium and continues to be a leading and influential figure in the field. I was curious to see how much this particular view of Twenty-First and Spruce St had changed in the years since the photograph was taken in 1974 and it is possible to visit almost exactly the same spot in which Shore took it on Googlemaps. Everything is as it was in the 1970’s bar the style of the cars parked on the street and the absence of a rather nice tree. You can see the view here. Shore is represented at the fair by Gallery 19/21.

Raoul Ubac. Pierres Assemblées (Stones), 1933. Vintage gelatin silver print. Titled, dated and signed on verso. Image courtesy of Gallery 19/21, Guilford CT

Raoul Ubac. Pierres Assemblées (Stones), 1933. Vintage gelatin silver print. Titled, dated and signed on verso. Image courtesy of Gallery 19/21, Guilford CT

Raoul Ubac (1910-1985) moved from Belgium to Paris in the late 1920’s and quickly adopted the prevailing Surrealist style in his photography. He studied in drawing and photography at the School of Applied Arts Cologne and it was during a trip to Dalmatia that he began to make images and drawings of stones of which this photograph is an example. The stones are lit against a deep black background much like the traditional method of photographing classical sculpture – the shadows accenting the contours of the surface. There is also something accidently comic in the form, you can make out a small unhappy face etched into the stone giving the shape the look of an undulating worm-like form perhaps emerging from the depths of the ocean. Ubac is represented at Classic Photographs by Gallery 19/21.

John Schott. Untitled, from special edition of the book Mobile Homes 1975-1976 (Nazraeli Library Series) Gelatin silver print contact print. Printed later. Image courtesy of Nazraeli Press

John Schott. Untitled, from special edition of the book Mobile Homes 1975-1976
(Nazraeli Library Series) Gelatin silver print contact print. Printed later. Image courtesy of Nazraeli Press

Another one from John Schott, this time from the series Mobile Homes 1975-1976 portfolio. Schott already published a selection of photographs from the Route 66 Motels series with Nazraeli Press in 2013 and it seems they are all set to publish another book for Mobile Homes in 2016. It’s hard to tell from Schott’s website exactly but this work appears to come from the California Mobile Architecture 1975-1976 project which Schott embarked on just after his Route 66 trip. Apparently approximately 20 million people currently live in mobile homes, or trailers, in America. South Carolina and Mexico top the charts with over 15% of residents living in this type of accommodation. The work ‘mobile’ of course is misleading, most mobile homes have no real mobility beyond the ease in which they can be manufactured and installed on site. Schott’s mobile home is definitely a permanent fixed abode with trees and shrubs landscaped around it. The home’s aspect on the end of the row means the asphalt of the road curves around it and in the black and white image you can feel the heat and a stark white light melting the pavements, beating down on the mountains in the distance. This is a world where living happens but nothing seems to be alive.

Los Angeles Classic Photographs is open 20th/31st January at Bonhams LA, Sunset Boulevard

Running parallel to the fair proper there is a whole programme of talks, tours and photographic book singing/launches. Click here for the full programme

Posted
AuthorSacha Waldron