10 October 2018 – 27 January 2019, Barbican Art Gallery

Point101 Highlights

Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde Installation view featuring Mikhail Larionov, Paysage, 1912 Natalia Goncharova, Rowers, 1912 Natalia Goncharova, La lampe électrique, 1913 Barbican Art Gallery 10 October 2018 – 27 January 2019 © John Phillips / Getty Images

Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde
Installation view featuring Mikhail Larionov, Paysage, 1912
Natalia Goncharova, Rowers, 1912
Natalia Goncharova, La lampe électrique, 1913
Barbican Art Gallery
10 October 2018 – 27 January 2019 © John Phillips / Getty Images

Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde brings together private and public collection work showcasing the quirky and creative output of over 40 couples from the first half of the 20th century. These include paintings, sculptures and photography by a very interdisciplinary group that The Barbican has chosen for this show.

Legendary duos include: Jean Arp and Sophie Taeuber- Arp; Camille Claudel and Auguste Rodin; Barbara Hepworth and Ben Nicholson; Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera; Dora Maar and Pablo Picasso; Lee Miller and Man Ray; Varvara Stepanova and Alexander Rodchenko; Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West; as well as lesser known pairings such as Emilie Flöge and Gustav Klimt, Federico García Lorca and Salvador Dalí, Romaine Brooks and Natalie Clifford-Barney and Lavinia Schulz and Walter Holdt. Just to name a few.

This show was part of the Centre’s bigger project, The Art of Change; an exploration of the relationship between art, society and politics. Modern Couples hopes to highlight the ‘the way in which creative individuals came together, transgressing the constraints of their time, reshaping art, redefining gender stereotypes and forging new ways of living and loving’. Certainly an insight into how these iconic artists collaborated day to day and the effects they had on one another.

Throughout the exhibition we are given a glimpse into these very intimate relationships with additional photographs, love letters and gifts given between couples. What is more, we are constantly met with the juxtaposition of these different disciplines and the harmonious way in which they are forced together through love and, more prominently, creative interest.

“Importantly, the exhibition also challenges the idea that the history of art was a singular line of solitary, predominantly male geniuses.”

George Platt Lynes Paul Cadmus and Jared French, 1937 © 2018 Estate of George Platt Lynes Courtesy of Soloman R Guggenheim Museum, New York

George Platt Lynes
Paul Cadmus and Jared French, 1937
© 2018 Estate of George Platt Lynes
Courtesy of Soloman R Guggenheim Museum, New York

As homosexuality was illegal in 1950s America, a lot of the photography of recording such relationships was circulated only between friends, such as George Platt Lynes’s many documentations of Paul Cadmus and Jared French.

Frida Kahlo Le Venadita (little deer), 1946 Private Collection Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Frida Kahlo
Le Venadita (little deer), 1946
Private Collection
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Another one that stands out is Frida Kahlo’s ‘Le Venadita (little deer)’ which she painted after a failed operation. Critiqued speculation alludes to the fragility of her relationship with Diego Rivera as her self portrayal is likened to a wounded deer, which she kept as a pet.

Winifred Nicholson Jake and Kate on the Isle of Wight, 1931 National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh, Presented by theTrustees of Winifred Nicholson’s estate in accordance withher wishes 1985. © TRUSTEES OF WINIFRED NICHOLSON

Winifred Nicholson
Jake and Kate on the Isle of Wight, 1931
National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh, Presented by theTrustees of Winifred Nicholson’s estate in accordance withher wishes 1985.
© TRUSTEES OF WINIFRED NICHOLSON

Winifred Nicholson’s relationship with Ben Nicholson led the two artists to experiment with ‘reduction and flattening of the picture plane as a means of discovering the intrinsic essence of things’, focusing on family life and, notably, their children.

Tamara de Lempicka Les deux amies, 1923 Association des Amis du Petit Palais, Geneve

Tamara de Lempicka
Les deux amies, 1923
Association des Amis du Petit Palais, Geneve

Part of the exhibit highlights Natalie Clifford Barney’s The Temple de l’Amitie (The Temple of Friendship), an organised event in Parisian salons that was dedicated to embracing female desire and artistic innovation. Here we see Tamara de Lempicka’s Les Deux Amies (1923) amongst other paintings and photography celebrating creative lesbian and bisexual community of the time.

Literature is also key in Modern Couples , with Virginia Woolf’s Orlando: A Biography manuscript on display, as well as first editions of her husband’s work, Leonard Woolf. Poems scatter the gallery walls, including those by Brazilian sculptor Maria Martins for Marcel Duchamp and numerous other’s from Federico García Lorca’s ‘Ode To Salvador Dali’.

point101 hahnemuhle giclee print

Interview with Ryadraws

Ryadraws is a London based digital artist, currently exhibiting at Rivington Studios as part of The Anti Trump Art Show. 

 

Tell us about your upcoming exhibition as part of Creative Debuts Anti Trump art show

The exhibition will focus on our depictions of America’s celebrity in chief, Trump!  

There was an open call put out a couple of months ago, and I was one of the artists selected to exhibit on the 12th of July.

 

How strongly do you feel about social art as a young practicing artist?

Day by day we are continually being presented with distractions, and we forget what is going on around us. The issues that deserve our attention. Social art is a way for us to be informed by pretty pictures.

 

Where do you envision your work belonging? 

Magazines but mainly in galleries. We have gotten to a point where digital art is becoming more widely accepted and galleries treat digital art like you would any traditional painting.

 

How would you describe your techniques?

I replicate my traditional drawing process but in a digital space. Most of my work will start off with a pencil sketch on paper, and then I will scan the image in and render digitally.

I layer my images metaphorically, and bury meaning within to be discovered, and when possible add an Adrinka symbol if it matches the artwork.

The Adrinka’s are Ghanaian symbols of the Ashanti that represent thoughts and I use them in my work to further explain my ideas.  

 

Would you call yourself more of a traditional artist?

No, a lot of my work is digital, and there is no physical output until printed. Digital art has made my process more straightforward, I don’t have to think about being extra careful while drawing to make sure I don’t smudge the page etc.

Painting and sculptures are on my radar to explore, and I do write from time to time - I doubt I will ever share them though.

 

point101 hahnemuhle giclee print

What type of paper do you think works best with your printed artwork?

Hahnemuhle German Etching is literally the only thing I print on and gives me the desired visual. I can’t get enough of the grain and paper texture.

 

When you aren’t producing art, what do you like to do?

Sleeping, watching TV shows and I play games from time to time. I’m currently playing Zelda: Breathe of the wild. I set myself a project often just so I don’t get burnt out from drawing. At the moment, I’m teaching myself UI/UX and animation.

The usual stuff, reading and hanging out with friends.

 

Is there anything that particularly influences your projects or inspires you? 

Everything around me. Unfortunately, a lot of what fuels my practise tends to be the negatives. I’ll flip it and show my outlook on the topic.

 

Any more exciting projects on the horizon?

I will be illustrating a children’s book focusing on Ghanaian lore. Also on the horizon is a billboard illustration which will be a painting focusing on social commentary. I have a few ideas floating around on what I’m going to paint.

 

 

Ryadraws and The Anti Trump Art Show

The Anti Trump Art Show promotion with Ryadraws' artwork

The Anti Trump Art Show promotion with Ryadraws' artwork

 

"In response to Donald’s Trump’s planned visit to London on 13th July, Creative Debuts have joined forces with over 50 artists to show their collective disdain of the, ‘dangerous racism, sexism and narcissism that flow daily from the White House,’ through a unique art exhibition.
The exhibition celebrates a specially curated range of contemporary artwork including photography, sculpture, craft, fine art, and film whilst raising money for End Violence Against Women"-Creative Debuts 2018
 
 

See more of Ryadraws' work here.

Check out Creative Debuts.

point101 hahnemuhle giclee print

An interview with Daniel Roozendaal

We were very intrigued when we first printed Daniel's work at Point101 and, curious to learn how these artworks came to be, we contacted him to find out.

Daniel is represented by George Grace Represents, a digital illustration agency working with commercial artists who specialise in CGI, typography and animation.

 

How did you come to be represented by George Grace

DR:  A few months ago my work went alright, but was still looking for representation for quite a while. Next to my work within The Netherlands, I felt my illustrations and portraits could also work internationally, but I didn’t have the connections for that or know the right people. I then saw George Grace coming by on social media, and with the limited roster of artists and quality work, his agency appealed to me. I decided to send him an email, and I got a positive reply from George. From there on we started our collaboration.

 

What is your preferred medium?

DR: My preferred medium is pen, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. I actually wasn’t very fond of working digitally for a long time, but since a few years I’ve been experiencing the advantages of it, and I couldn’t do without it anymore. However, the last few months an urge for painting/drawing started growing, so I might pick that up again!

 

You have a very particular style, how did you develop this?

DR:  When I just finished art school in 2009 I had a very diverse style, actually, it couldn’t really be described as one style. I did everything from painting to drawing to collages etc. After a while I realised my work was too diverse for commercial use (this being the path I wanted to follow), potential clients wouldn’t really know what to expect if they would ask me for a job. So I consciously decided to take my work more in one particular direction. 

I liked the contrast of raw and blunt painted shapes, and delicate and realistic pencil drawings on top of that, so that’s what I did for a while. However, after some time I came to the conclusion that the realistic drawing was too time consuming; it didn’t work well in commercial jobs. I then started to look for simplification, dropping the realistic drawing and developing the work built up out of just the (organic) shapes. That’s when my work started to look like the way it looks now. From that point on I started fine-tuning this way of working. I started drawing shapes on printed photo images, scanning them and editing them digitally, creating layers of those shapes on top of each other. Later on I added more geometrical shapes, creating a contrast between organic and geometrical shapes.

 

Why do you choose the subjects that you do?

DR:  Subjects are mostly chosen due to a certain brief, but obviously I have a preference for portraits. I find the organic shapes that can be found in a human face very interesting, and I think my style works best when depicting those shapes.

 

When you aren’t producing art, what do you like to do?

DR: Kind of cliché, but just the usual. Hanging with friends, being bored, drinking a beer, waiting for public transport, going to a party, cleaning my house, watching pointless shows on television, being massaged, clipping my toe nails and eating tasteless food.

 

Find more of his work here

Follow him on Instagram.

Learn more about George Grace Represents.

Posted
AuthorNazy Raouf