10 October 2018 – 27 January 2019, Barbican Art Gallery

Point101 Highlights

Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde Installation view featuring Mikhail Larionov, Paysage, 1912 Natalia Goncharova, Rowers, 1912 Natalia Goncharova, La lampe électrique, 1913 Barbican Art Gallery 10 October 2018 – 27 January 2019 © John Phillips / Getty Images

Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde
Installation view featuring Mikhail Larionov, Paysage, 1912
Natalia Goncharova, Rowers, 1912
Natalia Goncharova, La lampe électrique, 1913
Barbican Art Gallery
10 October 2018 – 27 January 2019 © John Phillips / Getty Images

Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde brings together private and public collection work showcasing the quirky and creative output of over 40 couples from the first half of the 20th century. These include paintings, sculptures and photography by a very interdisciplinary group that The Barbican has chosen for this show.

Legendary duos include: Jean Arp and Sophie Taeuber- Arp; Camille Claudel and Auguste Rodin; Barbara Hepworth and Ben Nicholson; Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera; Dora Maar and Pablo Picasso; Lee Miller and Man Ray; Varvara Stepanova and Alexander Rodchenko; Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West; as well as lesser known pairings such as Emilie Flöge and Gustav Klimt, Federico García Lorca and Salvador Dalí, Romaine Brooks and Natalie Clifford-Barney and Lavinia Schulz and Walter Holdt. Just to name a few.

This show was part of the Centre’s bigger project, The Art of Change; an exploration of the relationship between art, society and politics. Modern Couples hopes to highlight the ‘the way in which creative individuals came together, transgressing the constraints of their time, reshaping art, redefining gender stereotypes and forging new ways of living and loving’. Certainly an insight into how these iconic artists collaborated day to day and the effects they had on one another.

Throughout the exhibition we are given a glimpse into these very intimate relationships with additional photographs, love letters and gifts given between couples. What is more, we are constantly met with the juxtaposition of these different disciplines and the harmonious way in which they are forced together through love and, more prominently, creative interest.

“Importantly, the exhibition also challenges the idea that the history of art was a singular line of solitary, predominantly male geniuses.”

George Platt Lynes Paul Cadmus and Jared French, 1937 © 2018 Estate of George Platt Lynes Courtesy of Soloman R Guggenheim Museum, New York

George Platt Lynes
Paul Cadmus and Jared French, 1937
© 2018 Estate of George Platt Lynes
Courtesy of Soloman R Guggenheim Museum, New York

As homosexuality was illegal in 1950s America, a lot of the photography of recording such relationships was circulated only between friends, such as George Platt Lynes’s many documentations of Paul Cadmus and Jared French.

Frida Kahlo Le Venadita (little deer), 1946 Private Collection Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Frida Kahlo
Le Venadita (little deer), 1946
Private Collection
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Another one that stands out is Frida Kahlo’s ‘Le Venadita (little deer)’ which she painted after a failed operation. Critiqued speculation alludes to the fragility of her relationship with Diego Rivera as her self portrayal is likened to a wounded deer, which she kept as a pet.

Winifred Nicholson Jake and Kate on the Isle of Wight, 1931 National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh, Presented by theTrustees of Winifred Nicholson’s estate in accordance withher wishes 1985. © TRUSTEES OF WINIFRED NICHOLSON

Winifred Nicholson
Jake and Kate on the Isle of Wight, 1931
National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh, Presented by theTrustees of Winifred Nicholson’s estate in accordance withher wishes 1985.
© TRUSTEES OF WINIFRED NICHOLSON

Winifred Nicholson’s relationship with Ben Nicholson led the two artists to experiment with ‘reduction and flattening of the picture plane as a means of discovering the intrinsic essence of things’, focusing on family life and, notably, their children.

Tamara de Lempicka Les deux amies, 1923 Association des Amis du Petit Palais, Geneve

Tamara de Lempicka
Les deux amies, 1923
Association des Amis du Petit Palais, Geneve

Part of the exhibit highlights Natalie Clifford Barney’s The Temple de l’Amitie (The Temple of Friendship), an organised event in Parisian salons that was dedicated to embracing female desire and artistic innovation. Here we see Tamara de Lempicka’s Les Deux Amies (1923) amongst other paintings and photography celebrating creative lesbian and bisexual community of the time.

Literature is also key in Modern Couples , with Virginia Woolf’s Orlando: A Biography manuscript on display, as well as first editions of her husband’s work, Leonard Woolf. Poems scatter the gallery walls, including those by Brazilian sculptor Maria Martins for Marcel Duchamp and numerous other’s from Federico García Lorca’s ‘Ode To Salvador Dali’.

Anna Clawson & Nicole Ward's new exhibition, Overdubbed Scenes opened on Friday at CRATE in Margate. The exhibition is the fifth in a series of week long shows in which CRATE have asked artists to respond to the very particular and miniature exhibition space of the Davis Lisboa Mini Museum of Contemporary Art, Barcelona, which is currently in residence at CRATE for six week. The Davis Museum was created in 2009 by Brazilian artist, Davis Lisboa, as an attempt to provide an alternative environment and structure for artists to exhibit within, an approx 8” by 8” by 8” clear acrylic box as opposed to the monolithic institutions that our art world and market holds as the goal for artists - MOMA, Guggenheim, Tate. The Davis Museum also provides an alternative currency for the exchange of commissions and artworks made for its institution with artworks often donated to the Museum after their exhibition and held in the permanent collection in Barcelona to be take out as and when needed in the various solo and group projects the Museum is invited to participate in. The artworks take the duel role of having the scale and portability of an edition whilst retaining the form of an individual artwork

The current Museum installation in Margate of the Davis Museum consists of the 'museum' box which sits atop a white plinth, a flag which states the Museum's goal as an 'island of resistance' to the 'tsunami' of the art market (laid out like a facebook page and status update which alludes to the Museum's origins as a non-physical space), an ipad which displays a looped history of the Davis Museum's exhibitions and a poster. Each artist that has been invited to respond to the Museum in Margate was asked to use the components of the Museum as they saw fit. The exhibitions so far at the Museum at CRATE have included a small paper model by Canadian artist Bill Burns, a television and shirt owned by Andy Warhol, Romanian artist Betts Robinson and an installation based on the subterranean sites of Margate by Bridgette Ashton.

Working mainly with print, sculpure and photography in their practice, Clawson & Ward have chosen to create new work in response to the Davis Museum's format of display in an installation they call Overdubbed Scenes which hints at the malleable nature of museum collections. This malleability refers to the continuous re-contextualisation of an exhibit or archive. During this translation, the archive’s content is susceptible to a range of influences including; public opinion, capital and changes to the political landscape. The miniature sculptural work that the artists produced takes the form of cut-outs based on architectural forms. Applying the methods used to re-animate and promote a collection by using small plastic suction cups to attach the printed sculptural work to the Davis Museum, Clawson & Ward refer to low-fi products produced solely for disposable merchandising. Using the Davis Museum ipad and incorporating the crop editing tool, the artists use a single photographic snapshot, one of women in red outside the Soviet Commissioned Ninth Fort Memorial to the Holocaust in Kaunas, Lithuania, to provide the backdrop to the exhibition. The women, some in hotpants, were captured on a photo shoot during the artists visit to the memorial site. The incongruous nature of their usage of the memorial site as a fashion location as opposed to a site of reflection or remembrance, make the lack of context to the photograph even more startling. The true meaning, like a lot of Clawson & Ward's work is buried underneath layers of complexity and abstraction and must be carefully unpicked. 

The next and last exhibition at the Davis Museum/CRATE will be a video and model installation by Benedict Drew called The Concha Institute. The work tells the, often trippy and dream-like story, of a man who has nasal trouble only to find out he has a museum of contemporary sculpture stuck up his nose.

Overdubbed Scenes by Anna Clawson& Nicole Ward runs until October 4 2013. The Concha Institute by Benedict Drew opens on October 4th and runs until October 12th 2013.

www.clawsonandward.co.uk

www.cratespace.moonfruit.com

www.davismuseum.com

Posted
AuthorSacha Waldron