point101 hahnemuhle giclee print

Interview with Ryadraws

Ryadraws is a London based digital artist, currently exhibiting at Rivington Studios as part of The Anti Trump Art Show. 

 

Tell us about your upcoming exhibition as part of Creative Debuts Anti Trump art show

The exhibition will focus on our depictions of America’s celebrity in chief, Trump!  

There was an open call put out a couple of months ago, and I was one of the artists selected to exhibit on the 12th of July.

 

How strongly do you feel about social art as a young practicing artist?

Day by day we are continually being presented with distractions, and we forget what is going on around us. The issues that deserve our attention. Social art is a way for us to be informed by pretty pictures.

 

Where do you envision your work belonging? 

Magazines but mainly in galleries. We have gotten to a point where digital art is becoming more widely accepted and galleries treat digital art like you would any traditional painting.

 

How would you describe your techniques?

I replicate my traditional drawing process but in a digital space. Most of my work will start off with a pencil sketch on paper, and then I will scan the image in and render digitally.

I layer my images metaphorically, and bury meaning within to be discovered, and when possible add an Adrinka symbol if it matches the artwork.

The Adrinka’s are Ghanaian symbols of the Ashanti that represent thoughts and I use them in my work to further explain my ideas.  

 

Would you call yourself more of a traditional artist?

No, a lot of my work is digital, and there is no physical output until printed. Digital art has made my process more straightforward, I don’t have to think about being extra careful while drawing to make sure I don’t smudge the page etc.

Painting and sculptures are on my radar to explore, and I do write from time to time - I doubt I will ever share them though.

 

 point101 hahnemuhle giclee print

What type of paper do you think works best with your printed artwork?

Hahnemuhle German Etching is literally the only thing I print on and gives me the desired visual. I can’t get enough of the grain and paper texture.

 

When you aren’t producing art, what do you like to do?

Sleeping, watching TV shows and I play games from time to time. I’m currently playing Zelda: Breathe of the wild. I set myself a project often just so I don’t get burnt out from drawing. At the moment, I’m teaching myself UI/UX and animation.

The usual stuff, reading and hanging out with friends.

 

Is there anything that particularly influences your projects or inspires you? 

Everything around me. Unfortunately, a lot of what fuels my practise tends to be the negatives. I’ll flip it and show my outlook on the topic.

 

Any more exciting projects on the horizon?

I will be illustrating a children’s book focusing on Ghanaian lore. Also on the horizon is a billboard illustration which will be a painting focusing on social commentary. I have a few ideas floating around on what I’m going to paint.

 

 

Ryadraws and The Anti Trump Art Show

  The Anti Trump Art Show promotion with Ryadraws' artwork

The Anti Trump Art Show promotion with Ryadraws' artwork

 

"In response to Donald’s Trump’s planned visit to London on 13th July, Creative Debuts have joined forces with over 50 artists to show their collective disdain of the, ‘dangerous racism, sexism and narcissism that flow daily from the White House,’ through a unique art exhibition.
The exhibition celebrates a specially curated range of contemporary artwork including photography, sculpture, craft, fine art, and film whilst raising money for End Violence Against Women"-Creative Debuts 2018
 
 

See more of Ryadraws' work here.

Check out Creative Debuts.

 

Old men dragon faces appearing in the carved doorways of a pagoda, the colossal Gautama Buddha presiding lordily over his empty surroundings, unpopulated streets and landscapes that seem to shimmer with their smudge-texture pencil-like surfaces.

 Pugahm Myo: Carved Doorway in Courtyard of Shwe Zeegong Pagoda. August 20-24 or October 23, 1855. Linnaeus Tripe

Pugahm Myo: Carved Doorway in Courtyard of Shwe Zeegong Pagoda. August 20-24 or October 23, 1855. Linnaeus Tripe

British photographer Captain Linnaeus Tripe (1822-1902) joined the East India Company in 1838 as a cadet for the Madras Infantry and very soon progressed to the level of Lieutenant, joining his own regiment in South India. It was not, however, until an extended leave (due to illness) in England between 1851-1854 that he began to experiment with photography. He returned to India with his camera and began to make images of the previously un-photographed temples and structures he saw around him and, later on, scenes he encountered in Burma. He would go on to be commissioned by the Madras government to act as official photographer for Madras, capturing sculpture, street scenes, religious and spiritual sights, inscriptions and architecture.

 Amerapoora Colossal Statue of Gautama Close to the North End of the Wooden Bridge. September 1 – October 21, 1855. Linnaeus Tripe

Amerapoora Colossal Statue of Gautama Close to the North End of the Wooden Bridge. September 1 – October 21, 1855. Linnaeus Tripe

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the V&A’s Nehru Gallery which exhibits a range of objects and artefacts from their South Asian art collection and also the V&A’s autumn India Festival – the museum celebrates the prolific output of Tripe through some of his earliest images of India and Burma. The 60 images on display not only showcase the countries as subject but also give us an insight into the particular photographic working methods employed by Tripe at the time. 

 Royacottah: View from the Top of the Hill, Looking North-Northwest and by North. December 1857 - January 1858. Linnaeus Tripe

Royacottah: View from the Top of the Hill, Looking North-Northwest and by North. December 1857 - January 1858. Linnaeus Tripe

 Pugahm Myo: Thapinyu Pagoda. August 20-24, 1855. Linnaeus Tripe

Pugahm Myo: Thapinyu Pagoda. August 20-24, 1855. Linnaeus Tripe

Tripe used calotype, a waxed paper negative, rather than the traditional glass plate negatives used by his peers back in Europe. This seems to be as much a practical decision as an aesthetic one as waxed paper negatives, although not ideal in a hot tropical environment, could be easily transported without fear of too much damage or breakage - essential for a travelling photographer. The use of paper also resulted in a distinct soft-focus look to Tripe’s images as the fibres of the paper negative transferred onto the paper print. Although he did make prints with glass negatives on occasion and these were generally favoured due to the clean sharpness that was expected from standard documentary photography – the very slight textured blur of the paper negatives give the images a painterly quality that seems to radiate the heat of the streets, the humidity of the air and the atmosphere of a romantic Eastern world changing rapidly – the ancient recorded as its faces the ongoing modernity.

Captain Linnaeus Tripe: photographer of India and Burma (1852-1860) runs at the V&A until 11 October. There are lots of good resources and info available about the exhibition online including more detail into Tripe’s working methods, extensive biography and a reading list if you want to find out more.

www.vam.ac.uk/page/l/linnaeus-trip

Posted
AuthorSacha Waldron

How much better than a sip of wine from a manky cup that half the church have had a go at and a wafer that sticks to the roof of your mouth?

Every Sunday service should involve a chocolate fountain. It would improve visitor numbers no end.

This week's Photo of the Week comes from Caravan Gallery a collaboration between artists and photographers Jan Williams and Chris Teasdale that seeks "to document the reality and surreality of the way we live today" and indeed they do. From "Mr Cheap" pound shops to dilapidated seaside resorts, urban graffiti and suburban decorative aspiration - Caravan Gallery seem to capture the very best and worst of the UK in glorious postcardian technicolor.

The photography duo, who exhibit their work in their very own dedicated caravan gallery space are currently in the midst of a UK-wide tour and the roaming exhibition, extra{ordinary}:Photographs of Britain by The Caravan Gallery, has been travelling to locations all over Britain since March 2015. You can catch the current leg of the tour at Impressions Gallery, Bradford (until 29th August) before it moves on to Diffusion Festival 2015 at Ffotogallery, Cardiff, in October. Expect to see more of their work on the Point 102 blog over the coming year.

 Chocolate Fountain in former church, Derby. The Caravan Gallery

Chocolate Fountain in former church, Derby. The Caravan Gallery

Posted
AuthorSacha Waldron